Question: What Is Surgical Site Infection?

What is surgical site infection?

A surgical site infection (SSI) is an infection that occurs after surgery in the part of the body where the surgery took place.

Surgical site infections can sometimes be superficial infections involving the skin only..

What are the types of wound infection?

What is a wound infection?Superficial incisional SSI – infection involves only skin and subcutaneous tissue of incision.Deep incisional SSI — infection involves deep tissues, such as facial and muscle layers.More items…

What are the 3 types of wound healing?

Primary healing, delayed primary healing, and healing by secondary intention are the 3 main categories of wound healing.

How common are surgical site infections?

SSIs are the most common and costly of all hospital-acquired infections, accounting for 20 percent of all hospital-acquired infections. They occur in an estimated 2 percent to 5 percent of patients undergoing inpatient surgery.

How often do surgical site infections occur?

SSIs occur in 2% to 4% of all patients undergoing inpatient surgical procedures. Although most infections are treatable with antibiotics, SSIs remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after surgery.

What is the most important part of treatment for surgical site infection?

Most surgical site infections can be treated with antibiotics. The antibiotic given to you depends on the bacteria (germs) causing the infection. Sometimes patients with SSIs also need another surgery to treat the infection.

How do you tell if a wound is healing or infected?

When healing, it is normal for wounds to discharge small amounts of pus. However, if the drainage continues and the wound begins to smell foul or have discoloration, the wound is most likely infected and will need to be treated by an UrgentMED specialist at a walk-in clinic.

How do you know if a surgical site is infected?

Call your provider if your surgical wound has any signs of infection:Pus or drainage.Bad smell coming from the wound.Fever, chills.Hot to touch.Redness.Pain or sore to touch.

What are the 7 types of wounds?

Are there different types of open wounds?Abrasion. An abrasion occurs when your skin rubs or scrapes against a rough or hard surface. … Laceration. A laceration is a deep cut or tearing of your skin. … Puncture. A puncture is a small hole caused by a long, pointy object, such as a nail or needle. … Avulsion.

What antibiotic is used for surgical site infection?

Cephalosporin antibiotics (such as cefazolin) are first-line agents for most surgical procedures, targeting the most likely organisms while avoiding broad-spectrum antimicrobial prophylaxis that may lead to the development of antimicrobial resistance.

What are the five signs of an infection?

Know the Signs and Symptoms of InfectionFever (this is sometimes the only sign of an infection).Chills and sweats.Change in cough or a new cough.Sore throat or new mouth sore.Shortness of breath.Nasal congestion.Stiff neck.Burning or pain with urination.More items…

How do you heal an infected wound naturally?

For open wounds that are infected, proper cleaning is important for healing. Soak the wounded area in warm water or put a warm, wet cloth on the wound for 20 minutes three times a day. Use a warm saltwater solution containing 2 teaspoons of table salt per quart of water.

What is the most common cause of surgical site infections?

Causes and risk factors of surgical site infections Infections after surgery are caused by germs. The most common of these include the bacteria Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, and Pseudomonas.

How do you prevent surgical site infections?

Use Basic Prevention Strategies from Category IA Center for Disease Control RecommendationsExclude patients with prior infections.Stop patient tobacco use prior to surgery.Apply sterile dressing for 24–48 hr.Shower with antiseptic soap.Provide positive pressure ventilation in OR with at least 15 air changes/hr.More items…

Which antibiotic is best for wound infection?

Some commonly prescribed antibiotics include:amoxicillin-clavulanate (Augmentin, Augmentin-Duo)cephalexin (Keflex)doxycycline (Doryx)dicloxacillin.trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim, Septra)clindamycin (Cleocin)